New molecule marker may help predict heart disease risk

Several months ago we talked with Dr. Paul Ridker about his study of heart disease risk markers in women that contributed to the development of the Reynolds Risk Score using C-reactive protein as a marker or indicator of the ten-year risk of developing a heart attack. Research into the prevention of cardiovascular disease continues apace.

Researchers from the Cleveland Clinic have published real-world results about a molecule that has the potential be a strong independent marker for heart disease and stroke in the July 10 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

  • Dr. Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D., Head of the Section of Preventive Cardiology & Rehabilitation at the Cleveland Clinic

    Several months ago we talked with Dr. Paul Ridker about his study of heart disease risk markers in women that contributed to the development of the Reynolds Risk Score using C-reactive protein as a marker or indicator of the ten-year risk of developing a heart attack. Research into the prevention of cardiovascular disease continues apace.

    Researchers from the Cleveland Clinic have published real-world results about a molecule that has the potential be a strong independent marker for heart disease and stroke in the July 10, 2007  issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

  • Dr. Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D., Head of the Section of Preventive Cardiology & Rehabilitation at the Cleveland Clinic

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